Tag Archive for Brian Hammill

Derrick Suwaima Davis Wins 7th Unprecedented World Hoop Dance Champion Title

Derrick Suwaima Davis The 24th Annual Heard Museum World Championship Hoop Dance Contest recently took place again in Phoenix, Arizona, and hoop dancers came from all over the United States and Canada made their way to compete for the ultimate title of becoming World Hoop Dance Champion. The two-day event featured 64 competitors and more than 3,500 were present for the competition at the museum’s Scott L. Libby Jr. Amphitheater. It’s a pretty big deal not only to receive the highest honor from your community and peers, but the first place prize also comes with a $3,500 cash award and this year that incredible honor went for an unprecedented 7th time to Derrick Suwaima Davis (Hopi/Choctaw)! He returned to Phoenix and hoop danced his way into the winner’s circle all over again. Check out his award winning hoop dance performance below:

With a score of 234 points our of a possible 250, Davis came in fourteen points ahead of the amazingly talented Tony Duncan (220 points), who earned the World Champion title himself back in 2011.

3rd place went to Lane Jensen of Mesa, Arizona.

Nakotah LaRance, popular with Hooping.org readers, came in 4th this year. As for the Senior Division winner, that title went once again to the incomparable Brian Hammill. The Teen title was awarded to Talon Duncan, brother of Tony Duncan, and the youth title went to Jaron Yazzie of Farmington, New Mexico.

Brian Hammill at Superstition Mountains

Brian Hammill With the Thanksgiving holiday approaching in the U.S., we are pleased to share four time World Champion Hoop Dancer Brian Hammill of Native Spirit, who takes us to Superstition Mountains for a very special hoop dance. We’re most certainly grateful for it. He says, “The hoop dance represents our journey through the circle of life. Each hoop represents a thread in the intricate web. The formations representing various creations that we see along our life’s journey. Almost every native nation has a story about the hoop dance.” Brian’s stories are always beautifully told, this time against a stunning desert landscape. He resides in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

Brian Hammill in Black Light

Brian Hammill What happens when Native American hoop dance goes contemporary? Let’s find out because the sacred story of life has no beginning and it has no end. Using hoops to create various symbols and shapes that tell the story of life, three time World Champion hoop dancer Brian Hammill of Native Spirit presents us with a traditional Ho-chunk nation hoop dance in living color, thanks to part of his performance being presented with some serious black light. Brian uses as many as 30 small hoops to create butterflies, snakes, eagles and more. He lives in Pheonix, Arizona, USA.

Derrick Suwaima Davis Wins 2013 World Champion Hoop Dancer Title

Derrick Suwaima Davis The 23rd Annual Heard Museum World Championship Hoop Dance Contest recently took place again in Phoenix, Arizona, and hoop dancers came from all over the United States and Canada to compete for the ultimate title of becoming World Hoop Dance Champion. It’s a pretty big deal not only to receive the highest honor from your community and peers, but the first place prize also comes with a $3,500 cash award and this year that incredible honor went to Derrick Suwaima Davis (Hopi/Choctaw) who won this year for an unprecedented sixth time! Davis last captured the World Champion title back in 2010 and this year he returned to Phoenix and danced himself right into the winner’s circle all over again. Check out his award winning hoop dance performance below:

With a score of 235 points, Davis came in ten points ahead of the amazingly talented Tony Duncan who earned the World Champion title for himself back in 2011, while Kevin Dakota Duncan placed 3rd this year with 215 points. The Duncan brothers were very high profile this year in part as the result of the appearance in Nelly Furtado’s Big Hoops music video. Watch their second and third place performances below:

Dallas Arcand: Hoop Dance World Champion 2012

Dallas Arcand

Dallas Arcand

On Sunday afternoon, to the beating of Native American drums in the final round at the 22nd Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, Dallas Arcand once again rose to claim the title of Hoop Dance World Champion for the Adult Division. Arcand, the 2006 and 2007 World Champion, transformed himself into a flash of red, orange and white as he twirled around the circular dirt stage with 12 orange hoops. Cheers rang as he looped the rings into formations creating a horse, flower and eagle. Arcand nodded to the head singer, signaling he was near the end of his routine. The singer hit the drums louder as Arcand tossed a hoop on the ground and executed a cartwheel over the ring as it rolled back. At the last beat, Arcand grabbed the hoop, landed on the ground, yelled and froze. Following the official rules, five judges from across the nation rated the contestants on speed, precision, showmanship, creativity, rhythm and timing.

Arcand is an Aboriginal hoop dancer from the Alexander (Kipohtakaw) Plains Indian Cree Nation, located near Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. A motivational speaker and a musician as well, he has been a World Class Hoop Dancer for 14 years. He also plays Aboriginal acoustic instruments, best known for native flute and has developed a unique singing and songwriting style sometimes referred to as ‘indigenous hip-hop’ performing under the name KrayZKree (on iTunes). Other World Champions this year were Tiana Schocko in Youth, Tyrese Jensen in Teen and Brian Hammill in Senior. How did Arcand feel about once again being given the top honor? “Awesome. That’s the only word for how this is,” Arcand said, holding his first place trophy. 55 Native American dancers participated in the competition this weekend with as many as 9,000 people looking on.

Hoop Dancers to Compete for Top Honors

Hoop Dancer It’s that time of year once again and The Heard Museum World Championship Hoop Dance Contest will be happening soon. Combining artistry, sheer athleticism and cultural traditions, the top American Indian and Canadian First Nations hoop dancers from the United States and Canada will once again be making their way to Phoenix, Arizona, for the prestigious title of world champion. The two-day event takes place at the Heard Museum on February 11th and 12th. Make your plans to join the 22nd annual celebration.

At last year’s competition, a new world champion was crowned: Tony Duncan of Mesa. The former four-time teen champion, now grown with a family of his own, achieved one of his life goals, winning the world champion hoop dance title. Duncan (Apache/Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara) is also a member of the world-famous Yellow Bird Indian Dancers, composed of the rest of the Duncan family. In addition to the Duncans you can expect to see seasoned competitors and crowd favorites such as current senior champion Brian Hammill (Ho-Chunk); Jasmine Pinckner (Crow Creek Sioux) and Lowery Begay (Diné). Celina Cada-Matasawagon (Ojibway), known for dancing during the opening ceremonies of the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, British Columbia, is also expected to compete for the senior title. Plus three-time champion Alex Wells (Lil Wat Nation) is returning to the Heard Museum stage after a hiatus. Expect the longtime Canadian favorite to give it his all to recapture hoop glory.

For many years, the intertribal hoop dance has expanded to incorporate new and creative designs and extremely intricate footwork. Each dancer presents a unique variation of the hoop dance, weaving in aspects of his or her distinct tradition and culture. Individual routines are presented using as few as four to as many as 50 hoops, which are manipulated to create a variety of designs including animals, butterflies and globes. Dancers are judged on a slate of five skills: precision, timing/rhythm, showmanship, creativity and speed.

Tony Duncan World Hoop Dance Champion 2011

Tony Duncan While Tony Duncan had captured the Teen Champion titled four times previously, when he entered the 21st Annual Heard Museum Hoop Dance Championship Contest he came in this time as an adult – and captured the World Hoop Dance Championship title. Duncan, who lives in Mesa, Arizona, wasn’t the only one in his family who did well either. Four of his brothers either won or placed during the championship this year as well. With a crowd of more than 10,000 there to cheer on a roster of 43 hoop dancers from all over the United States and Canada, it was Tony Duncan who earned himself the title and the $3,500 cash prize. 2009 World Champion Brian Hammill brought home his first Senior Division championship this year, while the Teen division award went to Christian Hazell. The judges included: Jocy Bird (Sioux/Mandan/Hidatsa), of Brookings, South Dakota; Victor Bob (Navajo), from Gallup, New Mexico; Kevin Connywerdy (Comanche), of Norman, Oklahoma; Bruce LeClaire (Rosebud Sioux) from Durango, Colorado; and James Pheasant (Eastern Band of Cherokee) from Cherokee, North Carolina. The 2012 contest will be held on February 4 & 5, 2012.

VIDEO OF THE DAY: In the video below Tony Duncan’s award winning performance begins at the 6:30 mark.